When Asking For Help Can Save Your Life

Several days ago I had one of the most harrowing experiences of my life. It was a lesson that I had yet to learn and it was a tough one

I was at a lake with my two kids and some other dear friends. We were packing up to leave and I was helping my son get dressed.  I looked up a minute later to see where my daughter was. She was nowhere in sight. I asked the young preteen girl we were with if she had seen her - she had just retrieved Alice from the shore. She said she hadn't. (I had assumed she was watching her: a lesson on assumptions right here!) I scanned the beach. Nope. I went to the water's edge and asked a family sitting there if they had seen a 1-year old girl. They said no. I paced the shore, terrified of the worst possible scenario I would find in the water. I ran to the lifeguard and asked him. Then I started running - literally RUNNING - around the beach. In panic mode. I knew my running might attract attention and I needed help finding her. I noticed my son was standing naked motionless on the beach but all else was a blur. I knew I had to stay near the water in case she ended up there but I kept scanning other areas too - up near the parking lot, toward the snack bar. All around.

I started praying. "I have to find her. Please. Please. I have to find her." Suddenly, I hear a voice in the distance yell, "We found her!" I ran to the voice (a man) and he was way down a path into the woods, along the lake's edge.  He said he had gone down the path initially, didn't see her and started to turn back. But then he heard a sound up ahead, and it was her. She had wandered WAY down the path.  When I got to Alice, I picked her up and kissed her, and turned to the man who found her (he was sitting with the family I had first asked by the water).  Apparently, they had started to look for her too after I had approached them. I thanked him repeatedly. Asked him his name. "Matt Perkins." He told me the story of how he almost didn't go that far down the path. I thanked him again and again. As we finished packing up and getting ready to go, still quite shaken, I explained to Arran and the girl how scary it was, but that we were all okay and that was good.  Before leaving, I walked down to Matt Perkins and and his family one more time and mentioned something about "good karma,"  and we left.  

The whole ordeal probably lasted only about 3 minutes but it seemed much longer.  My son didn't realize what a big deal this was, and I made a conscious effort not to blame anyone else but myself.  Even then, I shuddered at what if.. what if the worst had actually happened. I was lucky. Instead I had to learn from this.. never again to assume someone was watching her. Good thing there are good people out there. Good thing I asked. I knew that we all had been saved by this angel Matt Perkins.  This man was our savior. If I hadn't asked his family if they had seen her, would they have started looking? Asking for (and then receiving) help from strangers was a pivotal choice that day that gave this story a happy ending. 

There have been recent times in my life when I was afraid to ask for help. In building a business, and in seeking guidance with my own internal thoughts, are recent examples. I was too proud to ask. I was ashamed to admit that I needed help - I like to think of myself as self-sufficient, independent and capable. But seeking help is essential; in fact my life depends on it. We don't need to go it alone; in fact we shouldn't try to go it alone. We need other people to lift us up. Asking for help can save our lives.

Some of you may be thinking of asking for help in your lives too. Check out this free video seminar coming up for some help on transforming each moment in our lives!
 

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Rachel White

A spiritual counselor, intuitive coach and writer, Rachel Horton White founded Soulful Work Intuitive Consulting in January 2016 to support those searching for true purpose and fulfillment in their lives. Along with individual coaching, Rachel shares in the world a podcast of interviews with inspirational figures and guided meditations, a blog of musings, workshops with private groups and in workplaces, and interactive online courses. She taught American Government at a local community college in Portland, Maine, and was an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher in Guadalajara, Mexico. With a Bachelor’s Degree in English from Wellesley College and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of Georgia, Rachel claims her true education came from studying abroad in Dakar, Senegal in college. Rachel is also an amateur dream analyzer, piano player, traveler, outdoor enthusiast, Tarot reader, yogi, writer/painter-of-sorts. Her most important and blessed roles of all came in her early 30s, as wife to an incredible man and mother, guide and pal to two energetic, bright-eyed, young children in Portland, Maine. A spiritual counselor, intuitive coach and writer, Rachel Horton White founded Soulful Work Intuitive Consulting in January 2016 to support those searching for true purpose and fulfillment in their lives. Along with individual coaching, Rachel shares in the world a podcast of interviews with inspirational figures and guided meditations, a blog of musings, workshops with private groups and in workplaces, and interactive online courses. She taught American Government at a local community college in Portland, Maine, and was an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher in Guadalajara, Mexico. With a Bachelor’s Degree in English from Wellesley College and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of Georgia, Rachel claims her true education came from studying abroad in Dakar, Senegal in college. Rachel is also an amateur dream analyzer, piano player, traveler, outdoor enthusiast, Tarot reader, yogi, writer/painter-of-sorts. Her most important and blessed roles of all came in her early 30s, as wife to an incredible man and mother, guide and pal to two energetic, bright-eyed, young children in Portland, Maine.